“The Yellow Man” cited in 2016 Mariner Awards

Published December 26, 2016 by Philip Ivory

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I’m honored that, for my novelette “The Yellow Man,” I’ve been named a recipient of Bewildering Stories’ 2016 Mariner Awards. Because it was broken into installments, my story is listed on the awards page among “serials.”

My thanks to the editors at Bewildering Stories who treated this story with loving care since accepting it for publication earlier in the year.

Check out “The Yellow Man” and other recipients of the 2016 Mariner Awards.

 

Freeing the Stories Inside You: Writers Studio Tucson

Published September 22, 2016 by Philip Ivory

Tucson writer friends!

Do you have stories inside you, bursting to get out? Do you have the longing to write fiction or poetry, but perhaps lack the confidence to know how to judge and develop your own material? Feel stalled, stunted or blocked?

Take a class at the Writers Studio. Different days and times are available to suit your schedule. Writers Studio exercises will jumpstart your creativity and help you unleash new expressive voices from within. Our teachers are highly skilled and adept at nurturing and encouraging your creative expression.

Sign up today! Classes begin the first week in October.

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Tucson Poetry Event: The Offering with Eleanor Kedney

Published September 8, 2016 by Philip Ivory

Join Writers Studio Tucson for a special event on Sept. 9.  For details, visit:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1684550965200130/

 

Eleanor Kedney’s poems constantly surprise the reader with flashes of sheer intelligence and attention to language. While her spirited work no doubt engages the intellect, these are also poems of the body and the voice; this book never disappoints. The sensuality of The Offering is unavoidable and ultimately joyous. There is a music here that sings and rings and lingers in the mind.

—Juliet Patterson, winner of the Nightboat Books Prize

Teaching at Writers Studio Tucson

Published August 30, 2016 by Philip Ivory

I’m pleased to announce that as of the first week in October, I’ll be joining the faculty at Writers Studio Tucson as a teacher on the Intermediate Level.

I’ve worked my way up through the program, and the Writers Studio method has done a lot for me, encouraging me to stretch my writing muscles and attempt techniques I otherwise would have never have dreamed of using. (And it has helped me get a few things published.)

Want to try the program? Take one of our upcoming Tucson Workshop classes, available on Wed and Thursday nights, and on Saturday mornings. I know the teachers and they are all great.

Click Here To Sign Up Now.

If you ever hear yourself saying, “I would like to write more, but don’t know what to write about,” you’ll find yourself reassured by the variety of stimulating exercises to jump start your creativity. They’ll prompt you to unleash strong new voices that have been simmering inside you for too long.

“Every week, I presented a new story. Finally something did click, the very thing that’s their specialty at The Writers Studio, emotional content. Before, my work was dead. When I brought in my breakthrough story, I felt I was carrying a weird animal in my bag. It was the first story I sold.”

-JENNIFER EGAN, former student at The Writers Studio, winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for A Visit From the Goon Squad (Alfred A. Knopf, 2010)

You’ll receive friendly, constructive feedback from your teacher and fellow students, never with the intent to tear each other down, always with an emphasis to strengthening our use of writerly techniques to make our writing really sing.

Classes are also available in New York, San Francisco and Amsterdam …. and if you’re not in one of those places, there are online classes as well.

It’s a great program, so try it!

Fiction Publication: Most Of Us Are From Someplace Else

Published July 5, 2016 by Philip Ivory

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I’m pleased that today the online literary journal, “Literally Stories,”  published my short story, “Most Of Us Are From Someplace Else.” It’s about a group of eccentric characters who have created an unusual community in an abandoned railway station in a town in Pennsylvania. Read it here.

“Literally Stories” was launched in 2014, created “by writers for writers.”  It showcases a wide spectrum of short story fiction from new and emerging writers to more seasoned authors.

This story wouldn’t exist except for the “Write-to-Read” challenge issued last September by Writers Studio Tucson. The contest was open to past and present students of the Writers Studio and featured a writing challenged crafted by award-winning Tucson author Adrienne Celt. The writing prompt centered on the idea of “nested narratives,” inspired by the image of the matryoshka, or Russian nesting doll, containing smaller dolls.

I was honored that my entry was chosen as one of three winners of the contest, and I enjoyed the privilege of reading my story aloud at a Writers Studio event last November. (Read more about the event here.)

In accordance with Adrienne’s writing challenge, the story has a larger narrative in which are contained smaller back-stories about the residents of this oddball community, each of whom has suffered some disillusioning experience before finding a place to call home.

I hope you’ll read “Most Of Us Are From Someplace Else” and let me know what you think.

Thanks!

“The Yellow Man” featured in BwS Quarterly Review

Published June 19, 2016 by Philip Ivory

I’d like to offer a warm word of thanks to the very civilized folks at online literary journal “Bewildering Stories.” They’ve been friendly and communicative with me since generously agreeing to publish my very long story, “The Yellow Man.”

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On top of that, their panel of review editors have granted me the further honor of including “The Yellow Man” in the latest quarterly edition of “Bewildering Stories,” their second such installment for 2016. Check it out:  Bewildering Stories’ Second Quarterly Review of 2016.

If you haven’t read “The Yellow Man” yet, please do so, and let me know what you think. If you have read it, now’s your chance to enjoy some of the other eclectic offerings at “Bewildering Stories.”

My Novelette Online: “The Yellow Man”

Published May 29, 2016 by Philip Ivory

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From “The Yellow Man” by Philip Ivory:
“All you have to do is lift up that circle in the middle of the floor. Do you see it? And then go down there, under the floor, and get something. You’ll know it when you see it.”
Indeed, there was a circle in the concrete of the floor, about the size and shape of a manhole, and it seemed to be moving slightly.
That wasn’t right.
“No,” said Allan.
His heart was racing. Something about the circle made him uneasy. All his instincts told him to stay clear of it. When he tried to understand why, it just made the fear worse.
“You have to,” said the Yellow Man. “Or things will never get better.”

My first published novelette, “The Yellow Man,” is now available courtesy of the venerable online journal, “Bewildering Stories.”  CLICK HERE to read it now. (Because of its length, the story’s been broken, like a dark wizard’s soul, into seven horcrux-like parts,  all of which are now available to read.)

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“The Yellow Man” is a puzzle box of a tale, dealing with  childhood loneliness, identity and the shadow world between life and death. You may find it a bit sad and scary — but perhaps also touching and surprising.

For those interested in such distinctions, a novelette  — something  more than a story and something less than a novella — is a piece of fiction landing somewhere between 7,500 words to 17,500 words.

This is by far the longest piece I’ve had published yet. I’ve written one other novelette, yet unpublished, that’s about the same length as this one. And I presently have a novel in the works, but it will be a while before that one’s ready for public consumption.

“The Yellow Man” began last year in my advanced class at Writers Studio Tucson. My thanks to WS teacher Renee Bibby and my fellow class members for their encouragement and feedback, which were essential to this tale’s development.

“Bewildering Stories,” which features quite a dazzling smorgasbord of prose and poetry that you really should check out, has also posted an author profile about me. CLICK HERE to see it.

Please read “The Yellow Man,” and post your reactions here on the blog. Your feedback means everything to me. 

Thanks for reading!

Upon a Time: How Fairy Tale Feeds Fiction

Published May 10, 2016 by Philip Ivory

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Tucson writer friends … unlock the mythic story-telling power of fairy tales, and enrich your own writing. Join our friends at Tucson Writers Studio for this enthralling and illuminating event at Tucson Hop Shop on Saturday, May 14.

Beer and fairy tales, a combination devoutly to be wished!

Follow the link to learn more:

Source: Upon a Time: How Fairy Tale Feeds Fiction

Fiction Publication: “On Hyacinth Mountain”

Published May 1, 2016 by Philip Ivory

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From “On Hyacinth Mountain” by Philip Ivory

He came across a boy, perhaps eight, blondish, crouched, examining ants in the dirt.
“Hello,” said Bradford.
Not looking up, the boy said: “They’re taking it apart.” Bradford leaned in to see a grasshopper, still writhing as ants partitioned chunks off to carry away.
“Are your parents here?”
“You think you’re smart. You shouldn’t have come back,” said the boy in a glum sulky tone. “One time too many.”

[read this story now!]


I’m pleased to announce that my story, “On Hyacinth Mountain,” has been published in the May 2016 issue of “Devolution Z” magazine.

“Devolution Z” is subtitled “The Horror Magazine,” which should give you a clue that “On Hyacinth Mountain” comes from the grimmer, scarier end of the story spectrum.

So yes, the story’s a bit grisly and depraved but, I hope, not bereft of literary quality.

I developed the story last fall while taking the Advanced Class at Tucson Writers Studio, taught by Renee Bibby. Renee and my fellow students provided excellent feedback to help me deepen the story. I only began sending it out in April and, after a rejection or two, “Devolution Z”‘s acceptance came rather quickly.

Sorry, this time you’ll have to buy the magazine to read the story. Follow the link to Devolution Z, which will take you to Amazon where you can order either a digital version for Kindle ($2.99) or a print copy ($6.99 cheap!).

It’s the first time a story of mine will be available on Kindle or in a physical publication, so I couldn’t be more excited. I’m really grateful to the dark, twisted minds at “Devolution Z” for welcoming me into their fearsome fold.

Two of my other fiction pieces continue to be on the schedule for publication in “Bewildering Stories” and “Mystic Illuminations.” I’ll let you know when they go online.

If you get a chance to read “On Hyacinth Mountain,” I’d love to hear your comments, so feel free to share here on the blog. Thanks, and don’t read it with the lights out!